Paul, a servant of Jesus Christ, called to be an apostle, set apart for the gospel of God, which he promised beforehand through his prophets in the holy scriptures, the gospel concerning his Son, who was descended from David according to the flesh and was declared to be Son of God with power according to the spirit of holiness by resurrection from the dead, Jesus Christ our Lord, through whom we have received grace and apostleship to bring about the obedience of faith among all the Gentiles for the sake of his name, including yourselves who are called to belong to Jesus Christ,” (Romans 1:1-6)

One of the “cloaked” mysteries of the New Testament is why the Lord God sent Jesus the Messiah. The gospel of John states it quite clearly – “for God so loved the world.” If you know the gospel of John, you know that clear speech is rare – cloaked in mysticism as it is. And Paul, the supposed writer of Romans, is brisk and abrupt – hardly ever shy about speaking his mind. Much of his letters emphasis the responsibility of believers to live transformed lives in response to salvation and redemption. I had hoped to hear, through the scriptures this week, more “tender” words. According to the pattern of meaning of the Advent candles that I have been using this season, the fourth candle is to have the theme love.

Maybe I need to remind myself, and in the process beloved reader remind you, that love is not always “warm” and “fuzzy” but stalwart and enduring. It was the love or compassion that the Divine had for humanity that prompt Jesus Christ to be sent. A reassurance that humanity and creation is still and will always be forefront in the plans and consideration of the Divine. And a promise that anyone who believes with sincerity and authenticity is a child of God. This why – because of Divine love – Yahweh desired to assure King Ahaz, that while things looked grim he could set aside his worries for the present and focus on working towards a better future. That is a good message for us too, beloved reader.

“To all God’s beloved in Rome, who are called to be saints: Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ.”

I has said over the past few weeks of Advent that first we must have hope – a hope that is found on unshakable faith. Then next we have peace – because we know our deepest hopes will be fulfilled. With peace, we can feel joy – and spread the joy to others. And with joy in one’s heart love can take root. As you go through this week, beloved reader and into the time of Christmas, I hope, pray, and encourage you to show love – both tender love and resilient love to those around you. Selah!